ORCHESTREPurcell, Henry
Reprise:
Purcell, Henry - Reprise: "Come, come ye Sons of Art" for Winds & Strings
Z.323 No. 4
Vents & Orchestre Cordes


VoirPDF : Reprise: "Come, come ye Sons of Art" (Z.323 No. 4) for Winds & Strings (11 pages - 249.09 Ko)47x
VoirPDF : Basson (60.23 Ko)
VoirPDF : Violoncelle (60.83 Ko)
VoirPDF : Flûte (64.48 Ko)
VoirPDF : French Cor (61.72 Ko)
VoirPDF : Hautbois (63.32 Ko)
VoirPDF : Alto (61.39 Ko)
VoirPDF : Violon 1 (62.75 Ko)
VoirPDF : Violon 2 (62.45 Ko)
VoirPDF : Conducteur complet (172.41 Ko)
MP3 : Reprise: "Come, come ye Sons of Art" (Z.323 No. 4) for Winds & Strings 8x 127x
MP3
Vidéo :
Compositeur :
Henry Purcell
Purcell, Henry (1659 - 1695)
Instrumentation :

Vents & Orchestre Cordes

  8 autres versions
Genre :

Baroque

Arrangeur :
Editeur :
Henry Purcell
MAGATAGAN, MICHAEL (1960 - )
Droit d'auteur :Public Domain
Ajoutée par magataganm, 26 Fév 2023

Henry Purcell (1659 – 1695) was an English composer. His style of Baroque music was uniquely English, although it incorporated Italian and French elements. Generally considered among the greatest English opera composers, Purcell is often linked with John Dunstaple and William Byrd as England's most important early music composers. No later native-born English composer approached his fame until Edward Elgar, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Gustav Holst, William Walton and Benjamin Britten in the 20th century.

For his 1694 offering to the Queen, Come ye sons of Art, away, Purcell was on sparkling form, and produced an Ode markedly different to the majority of the twenty-two works which had preceded it. The forces utilized were greater than normal, with an orchestra replacing the more usual single strings, and there was a clearly defined role for the chorus. Recent successes on the stage had led to this more expansive style of composition, and the inspired text (probably by Nahum Tate), full of references to music and musical instruments, was one which gave Purcell’s fertile imagination plenty of source material.

The overture (re-used the following year in The Indian Queen) begins in stately fashion, its opening ten bars full of glorious harmony, and the lively canzona which follows is full of rhythmic ingenuity amongst its three contrasting motifs. But it is in the wistful adagio section that Purcell is at his finest: the sighing motifs and poignant harmonies are full of pathos, and the use of sustained notes, which cut through the middle and bass of the texture, is quite extraordinary. Rather than the expected repeat of the canzona, we are immediately led into the opening chorus, and the first of several repetitions of the main theme in various harmonizations and arrangements—a technique taken straight from the theatre. With the tune taken first by a countertenor, Purcell cleverly solves the problem of re-scoring for the chorus (where the tune would have either been too low or far too high for the sopranos) by providing them with a descant and retaining the tune in the altos, doubled by the trumpet and oboe. In the famous duet ‘Sound the trumpet’ Purcell resisted the temptation to use the actual named instruments, choosing instead an insistently lively two-bar modulating ground bass over which two countertenors demonstrate their virtuosity and giving the royal continuo players splendidly characterful lines. There would have been wry smiles in the orchestra at ‘You make the list’ning shores resound’, for two of the instrumentalists sitting in the band would have been the famous trumpeters Matthias and William Shore.

The only complete source material for Come ye sons of Art is a copy by Robert Pindar, dating from 1765, and contains several dubious pieces of scoring which this performance corrects. Purcell scored his overture for one trumpet and one oboe, though in subsequent movements he uses a pair of each. Some modern editors have added an editorial part for a second trumpet (often ignoring the fact that Purcell’s trumpets could play very few notes in their lower registers) and doubled oboes on these lines. Purcell’s intentions appear to have been different, and in the overture we return to his scoring which gave Shore’s remarkable trumpet playing the top line, and the oboe, in its richest register, the second part. Pindar’s manuscript also contains a timpani part in the final chorus, wildly ornamented and out of keeping with other timpani parts of the era. For the opening chorus there is little possibility that the instruments could have been used, for the music moves too far away from the tonic and dominant. But in the last chorus ‘See Nature, rejoicing’ the music is of a different character, tonally more stable, and it is hard not to imagine a timpani part. After all the repetitions of the music in the duet that precedes the chorus, a timpanist could easily have improvised his line.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Purcell).

Although originally composed for Voices (SSATB) & Basso Continuo, I created this interpretation of the Reprise: "Come, come ye Sons of Art" from "Come ye sons of Art, away" (Z.323 No. 4) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Partition centrale :Come, Ye Sons of Art Away (34 partitions)
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